The items on this page are commercially available games that my students enjoy in therapy. I like these games because they are inexpensive, and SMALL! My therapy rooms are small and because I work in multiple districts, it is important to have lightweight materials that are easy to transport. The games I've listed also have relatively few rules or steps so they don't take much time away from the "work" of therapy.

Cat & Mouse

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While not so small and easily portable, this game is a hit with preschoolers through 4th and 5th grade students!

Cookin' Cookies

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Students choose a recipe and slap cookies with their suction-cup spoons to gather the ingredients.....and hope that they don't get the rotten egg.

Dog Dice


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A bingo game, but with dogs and bones.

Jenga

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There are many knock-offs of Jenga that are available for very little money. Jenga is always a hit as a turn-taking activity in therapy. You can also use a permanent marker to write words on the blocks to customize the tower for a specific goal area (e.g., /r/ words, social thinking terms, vocabulary targets).

Monster Mashup

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Collect the body parts you need to make your monster first and win. An easy card game with simple rules to keep students motivated in therapy.

Peanut Butter and Jelly Game

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All of the pieces are contained in a small tin lunch box (durable when you are travelling between therapy sites). Students use cards to build PB&J sandwiches.

Stacrobats

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Easy to set up and not as loud as Jenga when it comes crashing down, Stacrobats is great to use for turn-taking in therapy sessions.

You Gotta Be Kidding!

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Each card contains four 2-choice questions that are funny, gross or just plain weird. For example, "Would you rather have to pick your nose every time you talk to someone OR spit on them every time you talk to them?" The reader makes his choice and the other members of the group have to decide what they think the reader would choose. It is an excellent game for spontaneous speech and language practice with students working on articulation and grammar/syntax carry over. For students with social thinking difficulties, it challenges them to consider other people's perspectives.